• Mechanism of Food Immune Reactivity and Autoimmunity

    Original Date: March 28, 2015
    Presenter: 
    Chad Larson, NMD, DC

    This presentation covers the contribution of toxic chemicals and dietary components to autoimmune disorders, mechanisms by which environmental toxins binding to various dietary proteins and peptides can result in breakdown of oral tolerance and immune response against these proteins and peptides, and the use of various food antibodies cross-reactive with different tissue antigens for very early detection of autoimmune reactivity.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • Helping Without Harming: Relationship with Food & Body as a Variable in Treatment Plans

    Original Date: March 28, 2015
    Presenters: 
    Hilary Kinavey, MS, LPC, and Dana Sturtevant, MS, RD

    This talk explores behavior change theory, eating competency and body shame as variables impacting the sustainability of dietary recommendations. Leave with tools for assessing a patient’s relationship with food and body to create a more robust picture for effective treatment.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • The Role of the Ketogenic Diet in Parkinson’s Disease 

    Original Date: March 28, 2015
    Presenter: 
    Angela Senders, ND, MCR

    This session reviews the biochemistry of burning fat for fuel, discusses potential therapeutic mechanisms of action for neurological conditions, and presents the study design of an ongoing pilot trial using a whole-foods ketogenic diet for people with Parkinson’s disease. 

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • East Meets West in the Kitchen: Principles of Chinese Dietary Therapy & Its Practical Application to Nourishing Prescriptions

    Original Date: March 28, 2015
    Presenter:
    Ellen Goldsmith, LAc

    Ellen Goldsmith, MSOM, L.Ac., teacher of Chinese Dietary Therapy for the Classical Chinese Medicine Department at NUNM will present how the Chinese medicinal approach to food and diet can be applied in a western setting and integrated into standard dietary recommendations. The Chinese medicinal approach to food is dynamic and offers modern health care providers a perspective which can support the cultivation of inner wisdom, a dynamic and viable way of eating that improves and promotes ongoing health through food.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • Culinary Considerations in the Patient with Active Cancer

    Original Date: March 28, 2015
    Presenter: 
    Robert Ellis, DO, PhD, FACP, CS

    This talk considers a multitude of factors including: human constitutions; food energetics; nutrigenomics; phytonutrient-rich super foods culinary herbs to support cancer defense capability health promotion and cancer inhibition. Specific foods to use during chemotherapy, radiation and surgery; and for cancer-related ailments, such as, nausea, anemia, immune suppression, fatigue, cachexia and insulin resistance are presented. Review of the issues involved in potential interactions between herbs and nutrients with chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments for cancer is discussed.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • The Effects of a Low-Carb Diet on Appetite and Weight Loss

    Original Date: March 29, 2015
    Presenter: 
    Diane D. Stadler, PhD, RD

    Low carbohydrate diets are one strategy that has been used widely by the public to promote weight loss. The popularity of these diets is due partly to the promise of a “metabolic advantage” that promotes faster weight loss without an overriding sense of hunger. People who follow low carbohydrate diets often report a sense of “food disinterest” that may result in lower energy intake and greater weight loss than those following other weight loss diets. This “food disinterest” may be due in part to a differential impact that low carbohydrate diets have on factors known to influence central regulation of appetite and energy balance. If low carbohydrate diets work by impacting central regulation of energy balance, then we would expect to see differences in patterns of circulating neuroendocrine hormone concentrations associated with weight regulation compared to other weight loss diets. Understanding the physiological mechanisms by which very low- and high-carbohydrate diets impact appetite and energy balance will lead to more effective strategies for weight loss and its long-term maintenance. 

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • Addressing Common Clinical Challenges with Prescribing SIBO Therapeutic Diets

    Original Date: March 29, 2015
    Presenters: Allison Siebecker, ND; Lisa Shaver, ND; Melanie Keller, ND; Whitney Hayes, ND

    A panel of SIBO experts from NUNM’s SIBO Center address clinicians’ most pressing questions, concerns, and challenges regarding a therapeutic diet for SIBO. Learn how to differentiate between SCD, GAPS, Cedars-Sinai and Low Fodmap diets. Understand individual variations of these diets in the context of food sensitivities and food allergies, eating disorders, and within pediatric versus elderly populations. Know when to consider an Elemental Diet. Access up-to-date resources for your patients.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • The Genetic Advantage to Weight Management: Utilizing Genetic Information in Therapeutic Diet Plans

    Original Date: March 29, 2015
    Presenter: 
    Valerie Ferdinand, ND

    In this presentation Dr. Ferdinand will discuss understanding some of the key markers in genetic assessment of weight management as well as how these markers can clarify diet recommendations for your patients and how this information can be utilized in the clinical setting.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM

  • Culinary and Medicinal Applications of Spices

    Original Date: March 29, 2015
    Presenter: 
    David Riley, MD

    Spices, a rich source of phytonutrients, have been used in medicine for thousands of years.  Black pepper, turmeric, fenugreek, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, and rosemary to name but a few spices all contain unique phytonutrients with a variety of mechanisms of action—from modulators of the inflammatory response to antioxidants to hormone like roles. Clinical conditions that can benefit from healing spices range from diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease to anxiety, insomnia, and depression.  This presentation will focus on turmeric, black pepper, cinnamon, ginger, and rosemary.

    1.5 general CEUs for NDs approved by OBNM